Dairy

Under normal circumstance, the liar is defeated...

Submitted: Mar 13, 2017
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

 Under normal circumstances the liar is defeated by reality, for which there is no substitute; no matter how large the issue of falsehood that an experienced liar has to offer, it will never be large enough, even if he enlists the help of computers, to cover the immensity of factuality. The liar, who may get away with any number of single falsehoods, finds it impossible to get away with lying on principle,This is one of the lessons that could be learned from the totalitarian experiments and the totalitarian rulers' frightening confidence in the power of lying -- in their ability, for instance, to rewrite history again and again to adapt the past to the "political line" of the present moment or to eliminate data that did not fit their ideology. Thus, in a socialist economy, they would deny that unemployment existed, the unemployed person simply becoming a nonperson...Hannah Arendt, "Lying in Politics," in Crises of the Republic, 1969; p. 7.

Nonpersons like the majority of voters who voted against Trump in the presidential election? Or the 14 million fewer with medical insurance by 2018, according to the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office? Or the press? Undocumented immigrants?-- blj


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In California water flows uphill to poverty and agro-plutocrats

Submitted: Mar 08, 2017
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

 

 

These days in California, water flows uphill to money1. and the people move east. Our working people--and the largest area of the hardest working poor people in California is contained in its richest agricultural counties2. -- are moving out along with the produce,  as more -- but never sufficient -- water moves in. This could lead to the conclusion that agriculture, at least agribusiness as it is practiced in the US, continues to create poverty in its fields while it squanders the resources of others for export led growth enriching fewer and fewer people as the agrarian dream has soured and curdled into a corporate nightmare where a permanent autocracy of hydro-kleptocrats owns the countryside and high-intensity, high-tech, highly armed police squads attempt to pacify the urban populations of the county seats.

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The farm economy is not the rural economy

Submitted: Mar 02, 2017
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

 

 3-2-17

 

Environmental Working Group

Will More Farm Subsidies Help the Rural Economy?

Scott Faber, vice president of government affairs

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Putting part of national security in hands of Valley-bagman Nunes is a bad idea

Submitted: Feb 25, 2017
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

 A spokesman for Nunes said that he had already begun speaking to reporters to challenge the story and that, “at the request of a White House communications aide, Chairman Nunes then spoke to an additional reporter and delivered the same message.”

Unlike the others, Nunes spoke on the record and was subsequently quoted in the Wall Street Journal. -- Miller, Entous, Washington Post, Feb. 24, 2017

 

 

 

 

 

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The news this time

Submitted: Jan 09, 2017
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

 

When you spread manure on a sunny day, the stinking dust chokes you. When you spread manure in the rain you have to worry about it running off and polluting creeks and rivers. Nevertheless manure is a good fertilizer. If it's spread judiciously, it helps any seeds grow better, even the seeds of doubt and sheer obliteration. -- blj

 

 

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"Public trust doctrine requires ..."

Submitted: Dec 14, 2016
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

 Public trust doctrine requires that natural resources like water be shared equitably. That means there must be diverse use of the water by the various interests that comprise the public. -- Jody Hallstrom, Modesto Bee, Nov. 25, 2016

Ms. Hallstrom's mention of the centrality of the Public Trust Doctrine is most timely, considering the recent federal water bill, which favors agribusiness over vital environmental interests.

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Baseline #2: State of the species

Submitted: Nov 30, 2016
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

 “Nowhere is this more evident than in California’s Central Valley, where intensive land development and use has threatened or extirpated dozens of native plant and wildlife species,” McConnell said. -- Central Sierra Audubon Society, Union Democrat, Nov. 11, 2016

And right here in the North San Joaquin Valley, the University of California built a brand new campus on top of endangered species habitat, which stimulated the biggest building boom in regional history. But now UC scientists are poised to closely study  the extirpation of species in the region.

 Extirpation is technocratic euphemism for wipe out, obliterate, or utterly destroy. -- blj

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Concerning proposed increases in some rivers' flows

Submitted: Oct 24, 2016
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

Badlands Journal editorial board has come to its position about the proposed changes in the distribution of surface and groundwater in the Delta and San Joaquin Valley.

The new appropriation of river water and regulation on pumping groundwater comes down to a battle between the California executive resource agencies and the money, influence and lawyers a half a dozen northeast valley irrigation districts can muster to defeat it. In other words, lobbyists vs. the bureaucracy, with a supporting chorus of county officials, local newspapers, farm bureaus, etc.

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