Environment

Latest invasion of Grenada

Submitted: May 08, 2013
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

It just doesn't make investment sense to pour money into alternative technologies when such a splendid speculative bubble is developing over the Monterey Shale Formation, promising to be the largest fracking bonanza of them all in the nation. So, the US hurtles onward to extract more petroleum to create more global warming while polluting more groundwater. Power without care is an abomination.

Badlands Journal editorial board

5-7-13

myFoxla.com

Encroaching sea already a threat in Caribbean

http://www.myfoxla.com/story/22184745/encroaching-sea-already-a-threat-in-caribbean

TELESCOPE, Grenada (AP) - The old coastal road in this fishing village at the eastern edge of Grenada sits under a couple of feet of murky saltwater, which regularly surges past a hastily-erected breakwater of truck tires and bundles of driftwood intended to hold back the Atlantic Ocean.

 

For Desmond Augustin and other fishermen living along the shorelines of the southern Caribbean island, there's nothing theoretical about the threat of rising sea levels.

 

"The sea will take this whole place down," Augustin said as he stood on the stump of one of the uprooted palm trees that line the shallows off his village of tin-roofed shacks built on stilts. "There's not a lot we can do about it except move higher up."

 

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Another petroleum by-product

Submitted: May 07, 2013
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

 

 People who take seriously the information that the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere is cvurrently at 390 ppm when science has stated that the tipping point (where catastrophic sea-level rise begins) is at 350 ppm, observe the current debate about oil – from academic institutional and state and national environmental groups’ divestment of holdings in fossil fuel firms to California’s governor, the Great Reflector’s jitterbugging on fracking the Monterey Shale Formation – and could notice that political hypocrisy is also a petroleum by-product.

 

Badlands Journal editorial board

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HAPPY 80TH BIRTHDAY, WILLIE!

Submitted: Apr 29, 2013
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

THE BADLANDS JOURNAL

EDITORIAL BOARD WISHES

WILLIE NELSON THE

HAPPIEST 80TH BIRTHDAY

EVER CELEBRATED!!

--BLJ

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The clear, loud sound of a whistle

Submitted: Apr 28, 2013
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

As this Water-War year shapes up, the lies, the slurs, the gaffes -- the "air game" as the politicos call it -- heats up with the temperature.

If only the desire of the agribusiness plutocracy that things remain the same -- i.e. get better and better for the richer and richer -- could be realized, somehow. Then we could all be happy farmworkers on the west side, enjoying the sun and dust-and-pesticide free fresh air. And for excellent wages, no doubt.

But, the facts are that things are getting worse and worse and the agribusiness utopia is a pile of artificially manufactured well known substances.

The agriculture they seek to increase is increasingly salting its own soil, returning the west side to a worse desert than it was before water was added and the ground was stirred by the largest tractors in the land. Species are going extinct at 100-1,000 times the pre-industrial rate; global climate change is already beyond the tipping point for ice melt/sea rise; and we are taking 121 million tons of nitrogen out of the atmosphere by the Haber-Bosch process "when the proposed boundary to avoid irreversible degradtion of the earth system in 35 million tons per year" (The Ecologial Rift, Foster et al, 2010, p.15).

That nitrogen extracted from the atmosphere not used for gunpowder is used for nitrogen fertilizers, like the 270 tons of ammonium nitrate that blew a 10-acre hole in the middle of West, Texas, removing the town's top employer and creating as yet unknown hazard to its drinking water supply.

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Pointless accounting

Submitted: Apr 16, 2013
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

As long as we try to account for water policy from the profit and loss ledgers of agribusiness, we are not going to get anywhere at all on the problem of production, natural resources and consumption in the midst of a growing global eological crisis that most certainly does involve California in multiple ways, most of which are exascerbated by water policy established by oligarchs. Nothing rational can result from looking at the balance sheets of a miniscule number of agricultural plutocrats on the weat side of the San Joaquin Valley anymore than the leaders of finance, insurance and real estate can be counted on to develop anything rational about urban growth and water use.

California itself is a system of unsustainable growth.Until we begin from that standpoint, no helpful policies will develop.


Badlands Jouranl editorial board

 

4-15-13

Chronicles of the hydraulic brotherhood

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CEQA's enemies: Rattlesnakes in coyote clothing

Submitted: Mar 28, 2013
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board
 
 
State Sen. Tom Berryhill, a Republican calling Twain Harte his home at least during this legislative season, has taken over leadership of the anti-California Environmental Quality Act forces since former Sen. Michael Rubio, R-Wasco, ditched the state Senate for a lobbying job with Chevron. The Berryhills are a clan of wrong, blunt speaking Republicans who have been representing parts of the north San Joaquin Valley for decades. 
 
Berryhill warmed up in a March 12 statement to the press with the following nonsequitor: “It is pretty much acknowledged in Sacramento that CEQA needs updating.
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Great "stewards of the land"

Submitted: Mar 16, 2013
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board
 It is one of San Joaquin Valley Ag-flak's favorite slogans-- that "farmers are stewards of the land" (and therefore could not do anything wrong on the land) -- that makes us gag to relate in light of the decline of the bees, domestic and imported. It would appear that agribusiness, which we have entrusted with growing most of our food, is killing the bees that pollinate so many of the food s we eat. We take the view that agribusiness is the cause of the decline because the more dominant this passionately greedy form of agriculture has become, the more idioticly defined by the narrowest economic aims (what a price for a world monopoly in almonds if it kills the bees) it has become (monopolies can control prices).
Clearly, these "stewarts of the land" cannot be trusted to conduct their business without destroying all that is not their business. We ought to begin thinking about bees, especially the Honey Bee, as an endangered species in need of government protection from bee keepers and farmers.
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Our grand "stewards of the land"

Submitted: Mar 16, 2013
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board
The continuing decline of imported and wild species of bees makes us gag at one of San Joaquin Valley agriculture's most cherished slogans: "Farmers are the best stewards of the land." Agribusiness, which we have entrusted with growing most of our food, is killing the bees that pollinate so many of the foods we eat. What is the real price for a price setting world monopoly in almonds, if during the largest annual pollination event in the world, the pollinators are destroyed? 
These grand "stewarts of the land" cannot be trusted to conduct their business without destroying all that is not their business. We ought to begin thinking about bees, especially the Honey Bee, as an endangered species in need of protection from agribusiness and beekeepers by a wise governing force. Instead, we have government, governed in the instance of the bees, by agribusiness.through the land grant universities and the members of Congress that agribusiness funds. We cannot expect the scientists or the politicians to bite the hand that feeds them.
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Last Week: March 3-9, 2013.

Submitted: Mar 16, 2013
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

California High Speed Rail -- A boondoggle in search of a Pork Barrel 

 

There is a railroad boom going on right now in the San Joaquin Valley. At least there is a boom going on in the newspapers about railroads, fast and not so fast.

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