Environment

Bravo for the Brothers from Hanford!

Submitted: Sep 21, 2011
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

This is a wonder idea -- to simply walk the best guess of what the route for the California High Speed Railroad might be.

Bravo for the Brothers from Hanford!

The next step is for the Valley growers, some of whom are old enough to remember other marches in past decades, to gather together with their heirs and assigns next April and hike from the Union Station in Los Angeles to San Francisco. CAll it the Ag Plutocrats' Pilgrimage against High Speed Rail.

 

 

9-19-11

Fresno Bee

Hanford brothers walk planned high-speed rail route…Tim Sheehan

http://www.fresnobee.com/2011/09/19/v-print/2545353/hanford-brothers-walk-planned.html

 Read More »
| »

"Job creators" and the government they've fixed

Submitted: Sep 07, 2011
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

9-7-11
Counterpunch.com
Obama Has Betrayed Both
Workers and Environmentalists Unite!
by SHAMUS COOKE
http://www.counterpunch.org/2011/09/07/workers-and-environmentalists-unite/
When there are zero jobs available, any job will do. This fact has been exploited by corporations now re-labeling themselves ”job creators,” since being a job creator in a time of depression brings a religious status similar to a rain god during a drought. Democrats and Republicans have lavished eternal praise on the “job creators” and in consequence have created a political atmosphere that is rabidly pro-corporate “job creators” and anti-everything else.

In practice this means that ANY new law or regulation that hinders the power or profits of “job creating” corporations is instantly attacked as a “job killer.” This type of logic is good for bumper stickers and Tea Parties but bad for those who suffer under the giant power of corporations, including working people, the unemployed, the self-employed, and the environment.

 Read More »
| »

The Cowgirl Chancellor’s last campaign

Submitted: Aug 16, 2011
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

 

 

When we read a recent article in the Merced Sun-Star about the city zoo threatening to close down, we could not help remembering the story of the baby bobcat commandeered by UC Merced for a mascot with a combination of willing and coerced help from public and private agencies. These agencies are mandated by laws and regulations to help rehabilitate injured and orphaned wildlife for release back into the wild rather than help UC get a mascot, particularly when it already had one. We include various newspaper articles through the years that mark the progress of the story in doting words. The McClatchy Chain’s Merced outlet stayed consistent to its goals of unconditional love of UC development and UC’s attitude toward the environment. If the biggest public institution of higher education in the world could stomp fairy shrimp, there couldn’t be anything wrong with it, right?

 Read More »
| »

Let us have the audacity of hope

Submitted: Aug 16, 2011
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

8-11-11
The Record
Rep. Cardoza considering retirement…The Record

http://www.recordnet.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20110811/A_NEWS/108110318/-1/A_NEWS

STOCKTON - It seems certain that Rep. Dennis Cardoza, D-Atwater, won't be representing Stockton after the completion of his current term, but it is not clear what his plans will be come the 2012 elections.

News reports have raised the possibility that Cardoza was considering retiring rather than running for a sixth term.

On Wednesday, his office said he hadn't yet made up his mind.

"Congressman Cardoza has not finalized his decision and will not for some time," Robin Roberts, his chief of staff, said in an email.

Maps of new political boundaries drawn by the California Citizens Redistricting Commission won't be final until later this month, and they could face legal challenges. Nevertheless, the drastically different boundaries for state and federal offices have started to shift the state's political landscape.


One of San Joaquin County's two members of the House of Representatives, Jerry McNerney, D-Pleasanton, already has announced plans to move to San Joaquin County to run for a newly drawn 9th Congressional District that contains many of the residents currently residing in McNerney's 11th District.

 Read More »
| »

Billionaires, bonds, bubbles and Browns, Part 2

Submitted: Aug 09, 2011
By: 
Lloyd Carter, Patrick Porgans, chroniclers of the hydraulic brotherhood

8-8-11

Lloyd G. Carter Chronicle of the Hydraulic Brotherhood
Budgets, Billionaires, profits and the Brown Family - Part Two
http://www.lloydgcarter.com/content/110808512_budgets-billionaires-bonds-big-profits-and-brown-family-part-two
 
The Browns and 50-Years of GO Bond Debts
Part Two
By Patrick Porgans and Lloyd G. Carter

 Read More »
| »

Farmland real estate bubble

Submitted: Aug 03, 2011
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

The Badlands Journal editorial board heard  this week from ranch real estate agents that prices for farmlard are rising on sales to investors looking for a home for their money. It reminded us of an article that appeared on this site last September.

Meanwhile (see below Badlands article and congressmen's latest ag-pork announcement), the dogs bark but the caravan moves on. -- blj

 Read More »
| »

Railroads in the West: Now and then

Submitted: Jul 18, 2011
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

7-16-11

Merced Sun-Star

High-speed rail: Ag worries over project voiced

Elected officials and growers discuss effects on farmland… AMEERA BUTT

http://www.mercedsunstar.com/2011/07/16/v-print/1971373/high-speed-rail-ag-worries-over.html

Farmers in Merced County voiced their concerns about the impact of high-speed rail on ag land at a joint hearing organized by state senators Friday afternoon.

Sen. Anthony Cannella, R-Ceres, and Sen. Mark DeSaulnier, D-Concord, who leads the Senate Transportation and Housing Committee, held a joint hearing, "From Food to Rail: High-Speed Rail Impacts on Agriculture" on Friday.

Sen. Doug LaMalfa, R-Richvale, and Sen. Alan Lowenthal, D-Long Beach, also attended.

The event weighed the effects on ag land by the proposed railway, intended to carry passengers between San Francisco, Sacramento and Los Angeles by way of the San Joaquin Valley at speeds of up to 220 mph.

Cannella said the event provided a chance for politicians to hear from the agricultural community, a major part of California's economy. It generates more than $30 billion a year in revenue.

 Read More »
| »

Moonbeam's Ditch

Submitted: Jul 12, 2011
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

Edmund Gerald "Jerry" Brown Jr."s father, Edmund G. "Pat" Brown, once said to a group of supporters in Plumas County in the far north of the state that the state would take all the water in that region for Southern California. Realizing the gaff, he covered himself by saying he meant that a huge pipeline would be built from Canada to LA instead. Pat Brown was a true believer in dams, aqueducts and the whole panoply of water development for "this Great Big Number One State of Ours," particularly if the infrastructure had his name on it.

Gov. Jerry Brown (both a former governor and a present governor) waffled as much on the peripheral canal as he did on Prop. 13, the property tax initiative. His choice of Gerry Meral as assistant secretary of Natural Resources in charge of the Bay-Delta conservation planning and an advocate for a peripheral canal indicates the governor is for a peripheral canal.

Let us suggest a name for the peripheral canal as worthy of Jerry Brown as his father's name is worthy of  the Edmund G. "Pat" Brown California Aqueduct. Let's call the new "Delta conveyance," a peripheral canal by another name, "Moonbeam's Ditch."

Badlands Journal editorial board

7-9-11
Switchboard…Natural Resources Defense Council Staff Blog

Why We Work to Protect California's Bay-Delta Estuary…Doug Obegi’s Blog

 Read More »
| »

Global warming and world economic governance

Submitted: Jun 24, 2011
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

severity and speed of global warming and also notice that the real political economic powers in the West, the ancient white Bilderbergers are still talking about global economic power and control. Someday they will be meeting in a secret igloo discussing the sizes of their piles of rat pelts.

Badlands Journal editorial board

6-23-11
Al-Jazeera-English
Climate Change: It's Bad and Getting Worse
Severe weather events are wracking the planet, and experts warn of even greater consequences to come.
by Dahr Jamail
http://www.commondreams.org/headline/2011/06/23
The rate of ice loss in two of Greenland's largest glaciers has increased so much in the last 10 years that the amount of melted water would be enough to completely fill Lake Erie, one of the five Great Lakes in North America.

 West Texas is currently undergoing its worst drought since the Dust Bowl of the 1930s, leaving wheat and cotton crops in the state in an extremely dire situation due to lack of soil moisture, as wildfires continue to burn.

Central China recently experienced its worst drought in more than 50 years. Regional authorities have declared more than 1,300 lakes "dead", meaning they are out of use for both irrigation and drinking water supply.

 Read More »
| »

Fire, water and radioactive drift in the Wild West

Submitted: Jun 17, 2011
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

6-16-11
CounterPunch
Fire's Manifest Destiny
The American West in Flames
By CHIP WARD
http://www.counterpunch.com/ward06162011.html
Arizona is burning. Texas, too. New Mexico is next. If you need a grim reminder that an already arid West is burning up and blowing away, here it is. As I write this, more than 700 square miles of Arizona and more than 4,300 square miles of Texas have been swept by monster wildfires. Consider those massive columns of acrid smoke drifting eastward as a kind of smoke signal warning us that a globally warming world is not a matter of some future worst-case scenario. It's happening right here, right now.

Air tankers have been dropping fire retardant on what is being called the Wallow fire in Arizona and firefighting crews have been mobilized from across the West, but the fire remained "zero contained" for most of last week and only 18% so early in the new week, too big to touch with mere human tools like hoses, shovels, saws, and bulldozers. Walls of flame 100 feet high rolled over the land like a tsunami from Hades. The heat from such a fire is so intense and immense that it can create small tornadoes of red embers that cannot be knocked down and smothered by water or chemicals. These are not your grandfather's forest fires.

 Read More »
| »


To manage site Login