Merced County

Cardoza refuses to hold town hall meetings on health-care reform

Submitted: Aug 10, 2009
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

Denny, the musician, speaks:

 

Modesto Blue Dog Democrat Dennis Cardoza, who was leaving Pelosi's office as liberals were streaming in, has more uninsured citizens in his district than any district in the nation. Cardoza, who wasn't among the four Blue Dogs who negotiated the deal but supports it, said the legislation will be "like an accordion for a long time, where members become concerned and then they get comfortable and then they become concerned. Everybody who has ever gone to the doctor has an opinion on what should be in this bill."—San Francisco Chronicle, Aug. 5, 2009

 

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Medical Assistance Program emergency

Submitted: Aug 02, 2009
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

 

Merced's Medical Assistance Program, which provides medical care to among the county's poorest residents, needs $500,000 or it will have to cut 400 patients off its eligibility list. The issue was heard at the July 21, 2009 Merced County Board of Supervisors meeting and board consideration of this issue will continue at the August 18, 2009 meeting.

 

Badlands Journal editorial board has several suggestions for the supervisors that would avoid cutting 400 patients off the MAP program, sending them to the far more expensive emergency room.

 

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Triumph of dogma over thought

Submitted: Jul 29, 2009
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

News From…

 

Congressman Dennis Cardoza

18th Congressional District of California

 Congressman Cardoza hails long-awaited House passage of PAYGO budget requirement 

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Hun vetoes Williamson Act subventions

Submitted: Jul 29, 2009
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger used his line-item veto power Tuesday to kill a legislative compromise that would have cut the state's Williamson Act subvention to counties by 20 percent. The Hun axed it all, leaving a token $1,000 in the fund.

Reports are coming in from rural counties across the state:

"Fresno County will lose about $4.8 million in Williamson Act money ...Tulare County will lose about $3.4 million in Williamson Act money, officials said. Madera County Supervisor Frank Bigelow said his county will be out $1.3 million. 'We're either going to have to borrow the money ... or we're going to have to make cuts to police or libraries,' he said." -- Fresno Bee, July 29, 2009 (via CVSEN clipping service)

Tehama County to lose $800,000 -- Corning Observer, July 28, 2009

Eighth District Assemblywoman Mariko Yamada ... said the governor's "reduction in annual Williamson Act subventions to local governments for forgone property tax revenues, in effect, eliminates the Act and continues the assault on agriculture in California. Without this land protection program, California will likely lose more farmland to development -- something we will never be able to regain." -- Woodland Daily Democrat, July 29, 2009.

Glenn County to lose $950,000 in state subventions for land enrolled in the Williamson Act -- Orland Press-Register, July 28, 2009

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Frago and the law

Submitted: Jul 24, 2009
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

7-22-09

Merced Sun-Star

http://www.mercedsunstar.com/177/story/963037.html

Letter: Patience is needed

Editor: Gary Frago made a mistake. He has admitted it and has apologized for it. Like others, I was surprised and disappointed. From serious eye-opening experiences like this, humble people can learn and grow from them.

Give Gary Frago a chance to address the issue from all angles, spiritual included. Elections are the time to select our City Council persons.

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California water: some recent theological texts

Submitted: Jul 12, 2009
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

Every culture has its sacred texts. Chinese, the Sumerians, Indians, Persians, Hebrews, Greeks, Romans, Arabs -- and on and on. You name the culture and we'll name the sacred text -- from the I Ching to the Koran and beyond. It is the world's greatest literature,

the true treasury of the deepest human values and highest human visions.

 

In California, we have the water news. Because we are so young, dynamic and full of the belief that economic growth equals population growth, the notion that natural resources, especially water, may have limits, has created a theological crisis here in California.

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And once again we approach the topic of leadership

Submitted: Jul 01, 2009
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

In May, Merced County official unemployment rate fell to 17.3 percent. -- Badlands

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Statement at Salazar Town Hall Meeting, June 28, 2009

Submitted: Jun 30, 2009
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

 
My name is Lydia Miller. I live in Merced. I am president of the San Joaquin Raptor Wildlife Rescue Center. I am here today representing the Center, Protect Our Water,  Central Valley Safe Environment Network, and South California Endangered Species Habitat Alliance.
The Raptor Center was a petitioner on the 22-year-old San Joaquin River Settlement.

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Credit and debit or water and fish?

Submitted: Jun 27, 2009
By: 
Bill Hatch

With the sounds of families splitting up in our ears, late-model cars disappearing to the repo man, empty houses standing all over town, and an unemployment rate correlated to one of the highest foreclosure rates in the nation, people in Merced are not inclined to weep for the plutocrat growers of Fresno, Kings, Tulare and Kern counties. We have all the water we need for agriculture on both sides of our county (they are provided by different sources) and our unemployment rate is worse than all the counties just listed.

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Almonds, an error and some questions

Submitted: Jun 23, 2009
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

Badlands has been consistent in writing that Merced is the largest almond-producing county in the state, nation, world and universe. Badlands is in error. According to the state Almond Board's statistics, Kern, Fresno and Stanislaus exceed Merced in almond production. Kern remains the largest producer, steady at 20 percent after 20 years. Merced and Stanislaus have diminished their slice of the pie by a few points in the last decade, while Butte has ceded place to Madera in the high single-digit category and San Joaquin County has dropped into the "all others" category since the late 1980s. The greatest increase has been in Fresno, lumped in with "all others" in 1988-1989 statistics, but last year accounting for 18 percent of the state's production.

Farm prices (per pound) in the last five years surged to a high of $2.81 in 2004-2005, but fell back to the $1.55 range, where they were in 2003-2004.

At the end of last year, total bearing almond acreage in the state stood at 615,000, non-bearing at 125,000. New plantings surged to 49,281 acres in 2005-2006, the highest number of acres recorded, and dropped back to 14,381 in 2007-2008, the lowest new-planting figure since 1992-1993. The two low figures might be related to drought.

"Impatient money"

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