Growth

Trans-foody reflections of New Yorker's Driscoll piece

Submitted: Aug 20, 2017
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

 Dana Goodyear, a Yale food journalist, has written an excellent article on Driscoll, the dominant corporation in the westcoast berry deal, as far as the article goes. I guess, for anyone who remembers Driscoll as an up-and-coming player, partnering with its growers as Bud Antle was with his lettuce growers with strict quality control, one wonders at times about the reporter's questions, or perhaps lack of them. There is also a strong similarity in terms of cosmetics over taste to what the Washington apple growers did to the Red Deliciou apple, millions of tons of whose packing-shed culls have been flowing into Watsonville's Martinelli Cider Co. for decades.

A kind of high-tech, corporatist, weightless obtuseness underlies the professionally written, fact-checked New Yorker production. One wants to know, in all this wonderful relationship with Driscoll's actual berry producers, what kind of deal these producers have with this ultra-modern, nearly Silicon Valley-perfect business firm.  

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Other views on American white resentment

Submitted: Aug 18, 2017
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

 8-13-17

Arnold Schwarzenegger

Charlottesville

https://www.facebook.com/notes/arnold-schwarzenegger/charlottesville/10155766543359658/

 

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Gateway to a ghost (down)town and other city council foibles

Submitted: Aug 10, 2017
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

 There is nothing quite as revolting as watching a land-use planning authority rejoice in the anticipation of spending millions in the taxes they're going to get from some commercial development project they just approved on a piece of dirt in the outskirts of their town. It's a wet dream.

In the case of the City of Merced, we have a city manager, Steve Carrigan,  former director of economic development for bankrupt Stockton, who has more need for public-management redemption than most of the others, although Frank Quintero and Mike Conway, two of Carrigan's ethically challenged assistants, could use a little new luster, too.

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Valley fires

Submitted: Aug 06, 2017
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

 

7-28-17

Fresno Bee

Some of the biggest fires in central California happened in the last five years

Aleksandra Konstantinovic

http://www.fresnobee.com/news/local/article164269617.html

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Brown engineering

Submitted: Aug 04, 2017
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

 

There is no state in the union or place in the world more dependent on hydraulic engineering than California, which is why the wave of doubt caused by the very serious problems with the Oroville Dam is so unusual that it is nearly unthinkable.

For generations, California universities have been producing engineers to develop every aspect of the natural environment of our state for the profit of those with the capital to take advantage and transform the landscape to unimaginably ugly-scapes of urban wastelands and industrial agribusiness -- deteriorating tracts and cows knee-deep in their own manure.

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Elite fundamentalists to the baracades!

Submitted: Jul 25, 2017
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

 The northern San Joaquin Valley public, at least, doesn't have to look any farther than the "boondoggle/land deal" called UC Merced, anchor tenant for the most severe housing construction boom/bust in its history, to see right through the campaign of scientists rallying to run for public office. All one has to remember is how scientists in the UC system and in the state and federal resource agencies charged with enforcing environmental law and regulation, not to mention public meeting legislation, bowed to political pressure and corrupted their own research to appease the UC and the finance, insurance and real estate special interests behind the Merced project.

 

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The Muslim civil war

Submitted: Jul 11, 2017
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

 This is an excellent article that begs this question: how humble to we need to become to learn what we need to know to survive our leaders?

If we stop for a second to imagine all the ways possible to dismiss this question, and ask where those voices come from and how you feel about them -- warm, cold, fearful, trusting? -- it helps us see how far down the road of endless war we have gone and what it is doing to us as a nation, a people, a society, a place we would want to live if we had a choice.

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Regulation and its absence

Submitted: Jul 05, 2017
By: 
Badlands Journal editorial board

 The dismal dialectic between government and business may be approaching the trough, even if it has not bottomed out yet. From this vantage point, the velocity of bribery having slowed from the sheer volume of the current bribes, something almost like a calm prevails. And in this calm it is possible to see why government regulates on behalf of the people and why business reacts and works to undermine and destroy every governmental regulation. Out of the latter motive comes such idiotic slogans as "The business of America is business," (Pres. Calvin Coolidge, 1923-1929), and all subsequent slogans in this vein, like the immortal chamber of commerce chesnut, "Government should be run like a business."

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